The MCFC license area is often made available to education and extension institutions to provide learning and research opportunities.

the following are current and past research projects, if you’re interested in conducting research on the mCfc license area, contact us today.

Spruce/Pine Forest Management

In partnership with the Nova Scotia Department of Lands and Forestry and Westfor Management Ltd. we’re testing different ways to manage our spruce/pine forests to promote natural Acadian Forest conditions. Specifically the treatments with this research trial are; a seed tree harvest, a clear-cut removal that leaves large white pine trees as seed for regeneration, a strip cut with thinnings, and a treatment that combines thinning with small patch cuts. We’re excited to continue to sample this site as it regenerates.

Early sampling has indicated that all treatments have increased density of white pine post-treatment. All treatments will be continually monitored over time to measure changes in growth in residual trees and variability in seedling regeneration.

Aerial view of the MCFC Spruce-Pine research trial

Aerial view of the MCFC Spruce-Pine research trial

Operations map of the MCFC Spruce-Pine research trial

Operations map of the MCFC Spruce-Pine research trial

 

Biodiversity Study

In 2019, the MCFC began looking into the possibility of conducting a biodiversity and ongoing forest health study for the entire 15,000 ha license area. To help develop the project, the MCFC is working with a student from the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Forestry. Initial field work will be analyzed in fall 2019, and sampling will occur every 5 years. We’re looking forward to seeing the results of the study and how our forest and its residents change over time. Specific measurables that are being examined include: bird abundance, carnivore abundance, ground vegetation, and tree diversity and health.

General Manager, Mary Jane Rodger measuring understory vegetation density.

General Manager, Mary Jane Rodger measuring understory vegetation density.

Board member, Donna Crossland helping complete migratory bird abundance surveys.

Board member, Donna Crossland helping complete migratory bird abundance surveys.

 

Post-Fire Tree Regeneration

In 2016, a portion of the MCFC license area was damaged during an intense forest fire known as the Seven Mile Lake Fire. Since the fire, we’ve been working with a senior environmental science class to measure the health of regenerating and planted trees in the post-fire landscape.

From initial results, seedling health of both white pine and spruce seedlings to date seem to be successful.  Health index scores tend to rank higher for both species and there is a high percentage of new growth evidence for both white pine and spruce.  The data collected will be used as a base to monitor growth rates and health success over subsequent growing seasons for seedlings and can be useful in determining future success rates and reforestation plans.

Research tour following the Seven Mile Lake forest fire

Research tour following the Seven Mile Lake forest fire

Tree planters from Community Forest Canada helping reforest following the Seven Mile Lake fire.

Tree planters from Community Forest Canada helping reforest following the Seven Mile Lake fire.

 

Carbon Sequestration

As a manager of an extensive land base, we have the ability to look into ways to build climate-smart forestry practices into our everyday operations. In anticipation of future market opportunities, the MCFC worked with Dalhousie University’s Management without Borders class to conduct research on the policy implications of sequestering carbon on Crown Lands in Nova Scotia. Along with this project, we’re working to develop a pilot for climate forest management in a portion of our license area.

Read the full report from Management without Borders here.

 
Management without Borders students with their Crown and Carbon research poster at Dalhousie University in December 2017.

Management without Borders students with their Crown and Carbon research poster at Dalhousie University in December 2017.